Wentworth Countryside Walk

“Wentworth Countryside Walk, Rotherham (South Yorkshire)”

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I say this a lot, but Wentworth is probably one of the most lovely places I’ve ever been to. If you were to ask someone to describe a typical English village, I’m pretty sure that they would come up with something very similar to this small town on the outskirts of Rotherham. The Wentworth Countryside Walk followed one of Rotherham Council’s Doorstep Walks (here) and this was one of the first we did. It was fantastic to explore the glorious countryside on a sunny day. The views on this walk are amazing, and there are plenty of opportunities for refreshments with two excellent CAMRA award winning pubs, Elsecar Heritage Centre and a quick detour to the Garden Centre’s cafe if you’ve still got the energy at the end. There are also photo opps a plenty, such as the amazing Wentworth Woodhouse (above), and the Needle’s Eye. 

I’ve followed the instructions below and added some little insights into how we got on. There are a number of pictures at the end which will hopefully show you that this is a great walk to enjoy.

“1 – Start on Main Street outside the Rockingham Arms. Facing the public house turn right and walk through the Village on the pavement by the side of Main Street.”

I will admit we went a bit wrong at the start of this walk – whether the instructions are misleading or we were being dim – but we parked at the Rockingham Arms. Coming out of the pub / car park, turn left and walk towards the garden centre end of the village. We probably should have read the next bit and then we wouldn’t have turned the wrong way and added an extra mile to our walk!

At the end of the village turn left on to the public footpath opposite the war memorial and follow the path across the field to Clayfield Lane”

D’oh! The public footpath is a steep-ish uphill climb across a fairly uneven field. If you struggle with this, you can follow the road round and meet up with the next point.

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“2 – On reaching Clayfield Lane turn right and walk along the lane, passing the converted windmill on your left before arriving at Cortworth Lane”

This is an awesome building – I can’t imagine how cool it would be to live in a round house. It would also, I imagine, be very difficult to find furniture that fits!

“Turn left and walk along the pavement by the side of Cortworth Lane. After a short while you will  get your first glimpse of The Needle’s Eye through the trees on your left.”

You can also do a brief detour as on your right you will be able to see the entrance to Wentworth Woodhouse which is the stately home with the longest façade in the country and is very impressive.

“3 – Continue along Cortworth Lane, carefully crossing over Coaley Lane, and you will eventually reach Cortworth House on your left. Follow the public footpath up the drive to the house. At the top of the drive the footpath forks to the right and passes through a kissing gate. Keep following the footpath up the hill to the picturesque hamlet of Street.”

The footpath can be a little narrow at times, but it is definitely worth it as when you get to the top of the hill there are some great views across the open countryside.xfs_500x500_c80_IMG_2302

 

 

“4 – At Street turn left onto Street Lane and follow the lane to Coaley Lane. Taking extra care as you cross overCoaley Lane and follow the  footpath which runs down the side of Stump Cross Cottage. After a short time you will reach Needle’s Eye, one of the Wentworth Follies.”

The Needle’s Eye is a strange yet impressive structure which can be seen from all over Wentworth – it is definitely a good photo opportunity, if nothing else! It is a 45 foot high pyramid which is said to have been built by Earl Fitzwilliam to win a bet that he could drive a carriage through the eye of a needle. 

xfs_500x500_c80_IMG_2300“ 5a – The path then continues along the ridge with panoramic views of the Dearne Valley on your right and Wentworth Village and Wharncliffe Chase on your left. The footpath eventually descends into Elsecar passing through farmland and an area of woodland before finally arriving at Forge Lane. 5b – To take a short detour to the Elsecar Heritage Centre carry on walking along Forge Lane…”

The first rule of casual rambling is to always take a short detour if one is available – exploration is the way forward! On a sunny day, Elsecar Heritage Centre is an excellent place to grab an ice lolly and have a breather (and watch the Olympics in our case!), or if you prefer something a bit stronger there is also a pub there. There are loads of lovely craft shops and antiques stores. I would definitely recommend a visit if that’s your thing!

“After visiting the Heritage Centre retrace your steps back along Forge Lane. At the end of Forge Lanee the track splits into two public footpaths. Take the right hand route following the path across the fields and rejoin the walk.“6 – On arriving at Forge Lane turn sharp left and follow the waymarked path across the fields and through Kings Wood. At the far side of the wood continue along the winding track passing through Low Wood before eventually arriving at Barrowfield Lane.

Eventally is definitely the key word here! I remember worrying that we had missed something but we just kept going and ended up in the right place. It wouldn’t be a classic casual ramble unless we thought we’d gone wrong at least twice. You’ll end up walking along past the Saw Mill.

“Turn left onto Barrowfield Lane and follow the roadside pavement towards Wentworth Village. At the bend in the road turn left onto the track marked as a public footpath and then left again along the hedged lane which is also marked as a public footpath. After a short while the track splits into two as it gently descends the hill. Follow the track on the right.”

We may or may not have done this bit right, but it seemed to match the instructions, so we just went for it!

“7 – As the track steadily climbs up the hillside it soon turns into a footpath. Continue along the footpath keeping the hedgerow to your left. Turn right immediately after passing over the fourth stile and follow the fence line heading towards the Viillage.”

We met some rather spectacular cattle on this bit of the walk, again – not sure if we were supposed to or not, but the stile tally matched up! We just seemed to come out in a slightly different place than we were supposed to!

xfs_500x500_c80_IMG_2299“8 – On the edge of the village, the path meets Clayfield Lane. Pass over the stile and continue straight ahead along Clayfield Lane to its junction with Main Street.”

You might want to stop and have a look at the cricket for a little while – it is a very pretty pitch which is slightly above the level of Main Street, so has lovely surroundings.

“Carefully cross over Main Street onto the roadside pavement and turn left walking along Main Street through Wentworth village back to the Rockingham Arms.”

This is where the walk leaves us. However, once we’re in a mood for a walk and there’s a chance for just a little bit more, we normally carry on a smidge. Therefore, DETOUR ALERT!!

Once you’re back on Main Street, if you turn right rather than left, you will be able to walk past Paradise Square, which mightxfs_500x500_c80_IMG_2301 well be the most picturesque village green in England, have a little visit to the George and Dragon (an excellent CAMRA award winning pub with a massive beer garden) and then turn left and go up to Wentworth Church. This is a lovely old building, and you might be lucky to catch a wedding taking place as we were. There is a straight path leading straight up to the church, which turns left and leads you away from it. Both paths offer great views. At the end of the second path, you are able to either turn left and walk back round to the Rockingham Arms, or turn right and walk a little further to the Garden Centre. Depending on your energy levels, at this point you might want to leave the Garden Centre for another day, but it is a lovely place to visit with a number of small shops, petting zoo, maze, ornamental gardens and a great café. Oh and plants.

Wentworth is a really great place to explore, and this walk really gives you a chance to look at the surrounding area and the parts you might not get to normally see. Due to the number of cross field sections and hills, I would probably recommend this as more of a Summer walk, as I can imagine it could be a bit hardgoing if the ground were muddy underfoot.

Please enjoy our pictures from the Wentworth Countryside Walk. If you would like to learn more about Wentworth, the village website has lots of information about the landmarks, history and events in the village.

  • This converted windmill is on Clayfield Lane at stage 2 of the Wentworth Countryside Walk. This converted windmill is on Clayfield Lane at stage 2 of the Wentworth Countryside Walk.
  • This is the Needle's Eye - one of the Wentworth Estate's many follies which can be seen at stage 4 of the Wentworth Countryside Walk. This is the Needle's Eye - one of the Wentworth Estate's many follies which can be seen at stage 4 of the Wentworth Countryside Walk.
  • This is the glorious view across countryside which can be enjoyed at stage 5a of the Wentworth Countryside Walk. This is the glorious view across countryside which can be enjoyed at stage 5a of the Wentworth Countryside Walk.
  • This view of the village is seen on the way back down to the Ravenfield Arms at stage 7 of the Wentworth Countryside Walk. This view of the village is seen on the way back down to the Ravenfield Arms at stage 7 of the Wentworth Countryside Walk.
  • Paradise Square is definitely worth a little detour at the end of the Wentworth Countryside Walk. Paradise Square is definitely worth a little detour at the end of the Wentworth Countryside Walk.